Places to visit in Nuremberg

Amazing photo locations in Nuremberg of Dec 1, 2019


Description: Nuremberg for those who love walking around. I love to walk around the city and discover its stories, people, tastes, sounds, views. This walk takes a whole day and includes the most beautiful photo locations of the city. We will walk along the embankments of the Pegnitz River from the eastern to the western gates; we will be able to take beautiful photos near the Holy Spirit Hospital, the museum bridge, and the old meat market, the executioner's house, the chain bridge, and Maxbruck. We will leave the old city for a few minutes to enjoy the autumn park, enchanted by a crossbow shooter. We will visit the house of Albrecht Durer and find out the history of the most intriguing fake portrait in the history of humankind. We will have lunch at the oldest restaurant in the city and end our journey in the area of ​​the red light district.
Distance
9.36 km
Duration
8h 42 m
Likes
57
Places
69
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Wöhrder Wiese Nuremberg
Wöhrder Wiese Nuremberg
Wöhrder Wiese is a park in the center of Nuremberg. Polytechnic Institute buildings are located on two banks of the river, and students often walk in the park. It hosts a beer festival. In the Middle Ages, the first paper plant in Nuremberg was founded on the site of the current large lawn.
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Steubenbrücke Nurenberg
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Bridge Steubenbrücke in Nuremberg is named after General Steuben, a hereditary military man. He became famous in the battles near Prague, survived the Russian captivity, and fought in the war of the North and South in the United States. He owns the creation of the "Blue Book" - the US military code. The last years of his life he spent in New York on 57th Avenue. He was not married and had no children. Many historians tend to believe that he was gay.
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Steubenbrücke Nurenberg
Steubenbrücke Nurenberg
A beautiful view of the perfectly preserved medieval fortifications opens from under the bridge. The construction of fortifications on the island between the two tributaries of the Pegnitz River was a big problem for military engineers. They solved this problem brilliantly.
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Kassemattentor Nuremberg
Kassemattentor Nuremberg
A fortified wall in the middle connected three watchtowers while the bastion was erected in the flat northern slope.
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Kassemattentor Nuremberg
Kassemattentor Nuremberg
The bastion was an earthen rampart with a brick-vaulted passage along which holes for guns were installed.
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Cultural Center in Krakow House
Cultural Center in Krakow House
The three towers of the city wall face east and point in the direction of Krakow. In the Middle Ages, there were strong trade ties between cities. Today Nuremberg and Krakow are twin cities, and each of them has a cultural representation in another.
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Hoher Steg Nuremberg
Hoher Steg Nuremberg
Hoher Steg in Nuremberg means High Bridge. He was the first to meet the turbulent flow of the Pegnitz River during floods. Dams have been installed to control the water level.
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Monument to Human Rights Defenders on Sakharov Square in Nuremberg
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The artist Johannes Brus created this monument in 1992 on the square named after Andrei Dmitrievich Sakharov. Four massive columns are made of industrial presses. It is impossible not to feel their heaviness and pressure. They allegorically show the atmosphere of enormous public pressure and persecution created by the Soviet regime concerning Andrei Sakharov, the defender of human rights in the former USSR. Amid these columns is a blue rider on a strong horse. This horseman is not combined with either color, shape, or texture with the surrounding rusty pillars. It tells us how human rights defenders look like in totalitarian regimes. But the horse carries not one rider but two. These riders symbolize "there is safety in numbers" two are joining by one, then three by one, and so else, until a national movement appears.
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Herrenschießhaus
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Shooting clubs have their historical roots in the cities of the late Middle Ages. The burghers sought to preserve their rights and protect them from the encroachments of the rulers. In 1429, the Union of St. John was founded in Nuremberg. This year, the shooters were separated from the "crossbows." The houses of rifle companies were called shooting ranges. The Nuremberg privileged Hauptschützengesellschaft built such a house in 1462 at Johannisfriedhof. https://blauenacht.nuernberg.de/Herrenschiesshaus
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Pfarrgasse in Nürnberg
Pfarrgasse in Nürnberg
Pfarrgasse in nürnberg is one of the shortest streets. Its length is only 46 meters and it is sat on the left bank of the Pegnitz River. From here a beautiful panorama opens to the right bank and the church and the shelter of the Holy Spirit.
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Pfarrgasse in Nürnberg
Pfarrgasse in Nürnberg
From this place, the museum bridge is clearly visible. Note that it rests on three arches, but the left one is dark. The left arch is the beginning of a bypass channel through which water escapes during floods. Such an engineering solution saved the bridge from destruction.
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Heilig Geist Spital Nuremberg
Heilig Geist Spital Nuremberg
Heilig Geist Spital was a hospital, and now - a nursing home and a restaurant. For more than three centuries, the crown of the Holy Roman Empire has been kept here.
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Fleischbrücke Nuremberg
Fleischbrücke Nuremberg
The meat bridge is located at the narrowest point of the Pegnitz River. He withstood huge traffic. After the wooden bridges were destroyed by fire or flood in the 15th century, the Nuremberg Council decided to build a new bridge on the model of the Ponte di Rialto, over the Grand Canal of Venice.
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Insel beim Schleifersteg Nuremberg
Insel beim Schleifersteg Nuremberg
There was a department of the “Pegnitz and Rednitz rivers” in the Nuremberg Council responsible for the prevention and protection against floods. From old chronicles, one can see that between 1300 and 1956 there were twelve catastrophic floods with a tidal wave of more than 3.5 meters. In the 19th century, they reached the main market.
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Dancing Couple Statue Nuremberg
Dancing Couple Statue Nuremberg
This sculpture of dancing peasants is based on a painting by Dürer. It situated on the island called the island of love. The secret is the origin of such a name, but be sure that always good to kiss here. In mid-summer, the island often meets a Venetian gondola. If you like romance, you can book a gondola ride on Pegnitz, listen to "O sole mio" and watch the sunset on the river.
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Trödelmarkt - flea market Nuremberg
Trödelmarkt - flea market Nuremberg
The market was on the island back in the Middle Ages. At that time, pigs were sold there, so the square was called Säumarkt. Since the 16th century, the citizens of the Sebald (northern) part of the old city began to sell old and used items on the island. That is why in 1809/1810, Säumarkt was renamed a flea market.
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Wasserturm Nuremberg
Wasserturm Nuremberg
The tower stands on the banks of the river and is connected with neighboring Weinstadel. It is also connected to the executioner's tower on a flea island with a double-arch sandstone bridge, which is covered with a roof. Initially, the tower protected the arm of the Pegnitz River but lost its function when the last city fortifications were built in 1400. After that, the tower was used as a prison.
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Weinstadel Nuremberg
Weinstadel Nuremberg
This old half-timbered house is the largest in Germany. It was built as a shelter for lepers. But soon it was remade to store wine, hence its modern name. Now students live here - this is a dormitory.
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Maxbrücke Nuremberg
Maxbrücke Nuremberg
Maxbrücke was built by the chief builder of Rothenburg, Jacob Grimm in 1457. The three-block sandstone bridge is laced with cast iron and is considered the oldest stone bridge in the city.
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The executioner's house and bridge in Nuremberg
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The city executioners of Nuremberg lived in the house of the executioners for about 400 years until 1806. The former official residence of the executioners of Nuremberg and their assistants was installed in the old city walls and in the tower of the 15th century. The Nuremberg executioner, Franz Schmidt, kept a proper diary in the 16th century about all his executions and torture. Thanks to this information, you can get a fairly accurate picture of medieval law.
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Henker brücke Nuremberg
Henker brücke Nuremberg
The executioner's bridge over the Pegnitz River was built in 1457 and served for secret passage into the house of the executor. The executioner's profession was not popular and the inhabitants of Nuremberg avoided meeting with the executioners. Later, a wooden bridge began to be used for passage from the city to the island of the flea market. It became part of the complex, which includes a storage facility and a water tower.
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Henkersteg Nuremberg
Henkersteg Nuremberg
During the flood of 1595, ice drift damaged the bridge. Eight people were swept away by the wave. After the flood, three arches from the old city walls were demolished, and the executioner's bridge was rebuilt into a covered wooden footbridge. In 2000, it became a stop at the Nuremberg Historic Mile, which was created to mark the 950th anniversary of the city.
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Kettensteg Nuremberg
Kettensteg Nuremberg
The bridge was designed and built by engineer Konrad Georg Kuppler, who participated in the creation of the first German railway between Nuremberg and Fuerth. The poles, which were originally made of oak, were replaced in 1909 with a steel structure that still serves today.
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Kettensteg Nuremberg
Kettensteg Nuremberg
Kettensteg is the oldest surviving iron chain bridge in continental Europe. The narrow pedestrian bridge is about 68 meters long and offers beautiful views of the city. Here you can make the most beautiful photos. From the very beginning, it was used exclusively for walking. The chain footbridge is considered a historical monument and is part of the historic mile in Nuremberg.
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Nürnberg Hallertor
Nürnberg Hallertor
The Hallertürlein tower, like its counterpart in the east, Wöhrder Türlein, was a small pedestrian gate until 1400, when the last city wall was built. At this place, Albrecht Durer painted the popular painting, "Dry Path at the Small Door."
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Nürnberg Hallertor
Nürnberg Hallertor
The Hallertürlein Tower was a thin pointed tower (with the old name "Green") that leads to Gallervice. It acquired its current appearance after reconstruction in 1519. It was named after the Haller Meadow and the Haller von Hallerstein family. A watermark is visible on the wall during the 1909 flood.
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Nürnberg Hallertor
Nürnberg Hallertor
Hallertor connects Maxplatz with the Ringstrasse and is named after Hallertürlein. It was built in 1881/82 when the fortified wall was demolished due to the growing traffic, and the moat was filled with earth. However, the bricked passage of the wall is still called the gate.
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Haller Meadow Nuremberg
Haller Meadow Nuremberg
Hallerwiese is the oldest public garden in Nuremberg and is considered the earliest public green area in medieval Germany. City council of Nuremberg bought this meadow in front of the city walls from Margareta Heyden Haller in May 1434. The name of the garden reminiscents the former owners - the patrician Haller family.
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Schnepperschützbrunnen, Nuremberg
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An amazing impression is made by the crossbow fountain. It was created in 1904 by Leonard Herzog on donations from the society of shooters of St. Johanson. There is a plate on the fountain with the following content: “SNAPPER FOUNTAIN” by Leonard Herzog, created in 1904, marks the traditional crossbow shooting that took place here until the second half of the 18th century and the first was in honor of Emperor Frederick III in 1487. This is an amazing park in Nuremberg. It combines dull neglect with the desire to walk endlessly along its paths covered with fallen leaves.
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Neutorturm Nuremberg
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The Neutorn was one of the four main gates of the Nuremberg city fortifications, was mentioned as early as 1377, and led via St. Johannis (Nuremberg) to Fürth, Würzburg and Frankfurt am Main. In 1564 the tower was encased, and the Neutorbastei replaced the old barbican. A medicinal plant garden was created in the Neutorn kennel (between Haller and Neutorn), which is open to the public in the warm half of the year. A door at the Neutor Zwinger leads to the northern fortifications with the mayor's garden and the castle bastions.
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Tiergärtnertor Nuremberg
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The arched Tiergärtnertor consists of a square tower and a barbican. The origin of the tower, according to some estimates, dates back to the end of the 13th century. It was the main gate to Nuremberg in the northwest. Roads to Erlangen, Bamberg, Thuringia, and Saxony began here. The two upper floors were built in 1516. When the castle's bastion was restored in the mid-16th century, the barbican was demolished; the road to the west was led through a curved tunnel; the original gate was blocked. The German Museum used the Tiergärtnertorturm since 1852 as a warehouse for its first collection.
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Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
ALBRECHT - DÜRER - HAUS opening times: Tue - Fri 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sat - Sun 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Closed on Monday from Jull to September. During the Christkindlesmarkt open at Monday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tel: 0911/231 - 2568 Fax: 09 11/231 - 2443 Museums of the city of Nuremberg https://www.museen.nuernberg. de
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Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
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When Albrecht Dürer bought this prestigious house in 1509, it was almost 100 years old. Germany's most celebrated painter lived here until he died in 1528. By a miracle, the house survived the destruction of Nuremberg in World War I. Today it is not only a museum and a memorial to Albrecht Dürer but also the only place where the bourgeois lifestyle of Nuremberg from 1500th is restored and preserved. The house was constructed in 1420, together with a yard with a well and stables. In 1509 the house was purchased by Dürer for the substantial sum of 275 guilders. Only in1526 Dürer finally redeemed all interest charges on the house, but two years later, on 6 April 1528, Dürer died. Durer has no offspring, and his wife Agnes was the sole heir to the entire property. After the death of Agness, the house was sold in 1541. After the Second World War, the house was repaired and reopened in 1971. Modern construction was annexed on the 500th anniversary of Dürer's birth in 1995. Today there are guided tours by "Agnes Dürer" that demonstrate historic printing techniques in the "Workshop." In 2010 new methodic development for the museum was the creation of a graphics cabinet on the 3rd floor. The first thing, the visitor sees in the museum is the picture known by the title Albrecht Dürer, Nuremberg, 1500. This is one of the most famous self-portraits and at the same time one of the most mysterious. Did Albrecht Dürer really want to represent himself as a Jesus Christ in this portrait? Does this portrait really show 29-year-old Dürer, or was "the year 1500" simply chosen as a particularly meaningful date? The controversy among art historians continues. We will try to find answers to this and other questions during our visit to the museum.
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Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
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The visit to the house tells a lot about life in Nurenberg almost 500 years ago. This large room may have served as a sleeping room since the adjacent kitchen would have provided heat in winter. But that presumably would have posed problems in summer so we cannot be sure. The passage linking the room to the staircase is modern. The kitchen is the only room in the house whose purpose can be determined without a doubt—the kitchen utensils date from a later time. Privy space is the most exciting place in the kitchen. In 1520, Durer's health deteriorated, and he had part of the kitchen partitioned off as a "secret chamber" (toilet). At that time, access to this room was only from the corridor, where today's staircase is located. Dürer's family life was somewhat out of the ordinary: in 1494, he married Agnes Frey, at the will of both fathers. While Dürer's mother had been pregnant eighteen times, his marriage remained childless. In any case, the barrenness left them more time for work; Agnes helped with the distribution of Dürer's prints. He cared for his parents and his brothers, Hans and Endres, relocating his widowed mother into his household in 1504. We know a lot about Durer, even the piquant details. In 1515, Dürer was so severely insulted by a certain Jörg Vierling that the matter was taken to the City Council. Dürer left an incredible amount of personal documents: letters and diaries, annotated paintings, and countless self-portraits and portraits of his contemporaries. All evidence points out that the great artist seems to have been a great human being, too – if a bit suffering. Let us pass to the dining room. The generous glazing indicated wealth, both to inhabitants of the house and the citizens of Nuremberg. In this room, around 1885, Friedrich Wilhelm Wanderer, the previous possessor of the house furnished a prestigious "dining room," following the style of Historicism. The tiled stove dates from the 17th century.
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Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
In 1675 Joachim von Sandrart dedicated a significant chapter to Dürer in his great work published in 1675. This work signs the beginning of German art history, and right from the start, Dürer played a significant role in it. In 1681, the author bought Dürer's grave, had additional inscriptions mounted, and gave the grave as a present to the Academy of Visual Art, Germany's oldest art academy, which still owns the tomb today.
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Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
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Let us pass to the master's room. The staircase is thought to have been added in the 17th century. Until then, the various floors were a bit roomier than today. As in many other Nuremberg townhouses, access to the upper floors was probably via an external staircase in the courtyard. In this room, we can learn about the gilding process and other color preparations. To get a gilded page with text or picture, the sheet of the book was usually removed from the book, placed on the gilder's cushion. By using a broad, long-haired gilder's brush, the wafer-thin gold cover was applied to the surface which has been treated with an adhesive substance. When gilding, the surface has to be covered first with a soft lay bole of clayey, "fatty" mud; only then can the gold be polished. In the middle ages, this was done using a wolf's, boar's, or a horse's tooth. Malted gold is applied like paint with a brush. Showcase next to the door presents several materials the paints were made out. Lapis lazuli, semi-precious stone, was quarried in Afghanistan and brought over the sea to Venice. Monks in Venice specialized in the production of this azure paint. The stone was broken up, heated to 500 C, and ground to pale blue powder. This powder was blended with resin and wax into a mixture, which was then kneaded for hours. The kneading was then continued in cold water. This paint waa as valuable as gold Today's price: € 15,250,- per kilo. Arsenic sulfide is the mineral from Hungary. The powder was very poisonous and could only be used with a protective mask. Dürer liked to use this color when portraying black, blue tones. Semi-precious stone from Hoh Schwaz came from the copper mines. Schwaz was the second biggest town in Austria after Vien. 10.000 miners worked in these copper, and silver mines belong to a Fugagers patrician family from Augsburg. Dürer liked to use these green tones as a background color. Mercury sulfide. The alchemists heated yellow sulfur and mercury in the hope of producing gold. At a temperature of 500 C, it was disintegrating, leaving red powder. Ultramarine, Aurum pigment, Azurite, Malachite, Cinnabar, Dragon's blood, resin from a tropical tree; all of them were the essential ingredient for ink. Painters made white lead staunch ink. They were placing a roll of lead with vinegar in a receptacle, which was then put in the manure heap, thus exposing it to ammonia fumes and oxygen. After four weeks, the white crystals could be scraped off the lead. Heating to 350 C was producing yellow paint, to 480 C, orange-red. Mild vinegar was producing blue, sour vinegar, green tones. The insect lays its eggs in oak leaves, which then swell up with the development of the larvae (Cynipidae). These "gall apples" were dried and ground and mixed with sour wine and vitriol (ferrous sulfate) and brought to the boil, producing a brownish-black ink. Soot, egg-white, and water used to make black ink. Grit was used for transporting freshly mixed paint by sealing the edges of containers. The water-soluble resin was used as a binder for watercolors. Mastix - the resin from a bush found in Mediterranean countries, the pistacia lentiscus was used as a binder and as vanish, being especially transparent. Linseed oil or nut oil was used to produce the oil paints. Colors and pigments could be mixed at will.
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Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
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"Albrecht Durer was the greatest painter of all time, unrivaled in engraving on copper," says Sofia Frankl, who has been working in Albrecht Duer House in her workshop for 25 years. Anyone who watches Sophia Frankl knows that the artist said: "You can print from 50 to 70 copies on one plate." By the way, Dürer's most famous works, such as a rabbit and hands, were not copper engravings. They were painted. Only Sofia Frankl engraved them on copper.
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Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
Uploaded by Evgeny Praisman
With the relief printing press, which can also be used for press, Albrecht Dürer himself printed his woodcuts. The exhibit is a reconstruction made in 1971, the Dürer year, based on one of Dürer's sketches from the year 1511. The printing (wooden) block wet with ink from leather pads is placed in a retractable carriage on an underframe. The sheet of paper to be printed is attached to a swiveling cover in a frame that also protects the edge of the page from dust. The layer of paper in the closed cover is then brought down onto the printing block. The spindle and the platen attached to it are screwed down with the aid of the bar. The platen exerts pressure on the paper and the printing block, whose lines relief leave an imprint on the paper – hence the name relief printing press. Printing was a particularly lengthy process, as each sheet of paper had to be inserted individually. The Era of Geniuses Europe occurred around 1500. In 1503, Leonardo da Vinci created what is arguably the world's most famous painting Mona Liza, Albrecht Durer was working on the probably most influential copperplate engraving of all times his "Adam and Eve" of 1504. Since the 15th century, a breathtaking wave of renewal in visual art and architecture had been sweeping through large parts of Europe. We call this time the "Renaissance," referring to the rebirth of Antiquity. It started in Italy, but in Northern Europe was taken on in a very modified form. Here, the formal principles of the late Gothic period- prolific abundance and great attention to detail - remained valid for decades. Many German scholars studied at Italian universities and brought Humanism home with them. But around 1500, Italian scholars rejected the German "barbarians," which led to a kind of "national countermovement." Its spokesman, the famous poet, and scholar, Konrad Celtis, had been closely cooperating with Dürer. Thus Dürer had the opportunity to participate in the debates of his time with his works of art. Around 1500, Dürer's lifelong friendship began, with the essential Nuremberg humanist, Willibald Pirckheimer In 1494, Dürer traveled south, his destination unknown, but probably only managed to get as far as South Tyrol. In 1505 that he lived and worked in Venice for 18 months, painted a magnificent altarpiece for the German merchants there, and successfully sold his prints. Dürer irrevocably opened up the path from medieval craftsman to the autonomous, modern artist. We know more about the creative genius and human being Albrecht Dürer than about all the other artists of his epoch, but we still know far from everything. Dürer's parents were pious, and nothing points to the difference from Dürer himself. The church year, with its many holy days and devotions, permeated all areas of life, and the Bible was the highest moral authority in everyday life, too. About two-thirds of Dürer's enormous oeuvre dealt with religious topics, but Dürer's particular achievement is the completely novel, emotional treatment of old familiar issues. In 1525, Nuremberg, one of the most powerful city-states, gave an early and vital impetus to the Reformation. In 1520, Dürer opened himself enthusiastically to Martin Luther. But he also criticized the devastation wrought by the iconoclasts. Dürer's friend, Willibald Pirckheimer, later on, distanced himself from the new faith. Whether Dürer followed him in this, remains unclear. His artistic inheritance, the "Four Apostles", when painted in 1526 was not destined for a church, but for Nuremberg's City Hall: as a warning to Christians, whatever their denomination. And also, Albrecht specialized in an entirely new profession: that of book illustrator and free graphic artist. Many German scholars studied at Italian universities and brought Humanism home with them. But around 1500, Italian scholars rejected the German "barbarians," which led to a kind of "national countermovement." Its spokesman, the famous poet, and scholar, Konrad Celtis, had been closely cooperating with Dürer. Thus Dürer had the opportunity to participate in the debates of his time with his works of art. Around 1500, Dürer's lifelong friendship began, with the essential Nuremberg humanist, Willibald Pirckheimer In 1494, Dürer traveled south, his destination unknown, but probably only managed to get as far as South Tyrol. In 1505 that he lived and worked in Venice for 18 months, painted a magnificent altarpiece for the German merchants there, and successfully sold his prints. Dürer irrevocably opened up the path from medieval craftsman to the autonomous, modern artist. We know more about the creative genius and human being Albrecht Dürer than about all the other artists of his epoch, but we still know far from everything. Dürer's parents were pious, and nothing points to the difference from Dürer himself. The church year, with its many holy days and devotions, permeated all areas of life, and the Bible was the highest moral authority in everyday life, too. About two-thirds of Dürer's enormous oeuvre dealt with religious topics, but Dürer's particular achievement is the completely novel, emotional treatment of old familiar issues. In 1525, Nuremberg, one of the most powerful city-states, gave an early and vital impetus to the Reformation. In 1520, Dürer opened himself enthusiastically to Martin Luther. But he also criticized the devastation wrought by the iconoclasts. Dürer's friend, Willibald Pirckheimer, later on, distanced himself from the new faith. Whether Dürer followed him in this, remains unclear. His artistic inheritance, the "Four Apostles", when painted in 1526 was not destined for a church, but for Nuremberg's City Hall: as a warning to Christians, whatever their denomination. And also, Albrecht specialized in an entirely new profession: that of book illustrator and free graphic artist. With his "artist's book" of the Apocalypse of 1498 and the copperplate engraving of Cardinal Albrecht of 1519, he reinvented entire art genres anew. But mainly Dürer was the first person outside Italy to ask the central questions which still affect art today: What is beauty? What makes a genius? What can art express? What defines the role of art in society? Dürer's creations- around 100 paintings, 250 graphic prints, 1000 drawings, and three textbooks are as many attempts at finding answers to all these questions. Modern art seems to be 500 years old!
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Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
Oswalt Krel was the first Dürer's painted nobleman who was not born and raised in Nuremberg; here he represented a trading company from Ravensburg. This portrait belongs to a group of paintings that established the young graphic artist and illustrator as a portraitist, shortly before 1500. A rarity among Dürer's portraits, the person looks directly at the viewer.
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Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
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Selfportrait is the most famous painting by Durer. The history of this painting is also famous. In 1798 before the Napoleonic wars swept Europe, the painter, Wolfgang Küfner, who was later convicted of forging money, was commissioned to make a copy of Durer's self-portrait. Instead of the original portrait, he apparently returned a forgery of the picture, and this was at first not noticed in the turmoil of the French occupation. In 1805, Küfner offered the original painting to the directors of the Pinakothek Gallery in Munich - and art manager Maximilian bought it up at the price of 600 guilders. Thus to this day, the Alte Pinakothek in Munich displays a major work of European art history which was perhaps stolen. Almost ten years before, in 1786, Nuremberg City Council purchased a high-quality copy of one of the famous self-portraits of art history, from the collection of Johann Georg von Hagen. This picture still has riddles, these important facts such as the artist, the date and, most importantly, the reason for painting this copy remain mysterious. Even the back of the painting, with a layer of tow -a coarse fibrous material - glued onto the panel, was constructed similar to that of the original. In both cases, the purpose was to stabilize the painting surface which consisted of several thin wooden panels. Furthermore, there is a story of a "Patriotic Copy." In 1801, the Napoleonic forces occupying the city requisitioned Dürer's famous self-portrait for the "Musée central" in Paris. But someone in Nuremberg had covertly replaced the original with this copy - and the French did not realize they had been tricked.
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Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
Albrecht Dürer's House, Nuremberg
Despite its interest and quality, the museum is tiring, and exit to the street is often perceived as an exit to freedom. Moreover, the outside is light, fresh, and cold.
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Historischer Kunstbunker
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The historic art bunker is a tunnel system under the Nuremberg Castle and forms a station of the Nuremberg Historic Mile. The rock passages have been created in the hard sandstone since the Middle Ages. From 1939, at the instigation of the then director of the Germanic National Museum Heinrich Kohlhaußen, numerous of these rock passages were used to protect works of art from bombing raids. From summer 1940 the rock cellar Obere Schmiedgasse 52 was reconstructed in 1941 the Neutorturm cellar, and from 1943, the passage under the palace was also turned into art bunker. The reconstruction ensured heating, ventilation, and drainage; the bunker extends up to 24 meters deep and supplies optimal conditions. Today the shelter is the first fully automated museum in Nuremberg.
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Schmiedgasse, Nürnberg
Schmiedgasse, Nürnberg
This part of the city has preserved old houses. A little more, we will turn on the street, which will lead us to the old part. A bunch of grapes hangs at the crossroads as quite an evidence of the culinary alcoholic culture of Franconia. Wine is valued no less than beer.
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Kramersgasse Nuremberg
Uploaded by Evgeny Praisman
This part of the city partially survived during World War II. However, it burned several times in the Middle Ages. This is how the chronicles in Nuremberg describe the fire: an arc of flame and fire arose over the street, forcing everyone to step down to earth. Attempts to tear down burning houses failed because appliances broke or burned. Burning houses spread the fire. It spread from Bebenhuiser-Hof, through the Messger and Sufer guild pipes, northwest of the market, and in lower Messgergan with tailors guild pipes, baths houses, and Somiebe, over Ho-Berpital with a church, sheds, and barrels in Stutt and Grau. Kramers did everything possible to destroy what the fire feeds but in vain.
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Kramersgasse Nuremberg
Uploaded by Evgeny Praisman
The name Krämersgassen comes from Krämern (small traders). The street corner at Krämergassen 2 is one of the best-preserved parts of the modern old town. Tiny craft houses with half-timbered facades (No. 18, partially preserved from 1482) stand next to the broader stone buildings of higher quality. In the house of Ober Kraemergasse 12 from 1395, the founder and scribe Georg Kaper lived from 1453 to 1484. On the opposite corner, buildings on the upper floors are depicted, especially ancient half-timbered houses built-in 1452.
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Kramersgasse Nuremberg
Kramersgasse Nuremberg
The homes have a characteristic attic roof and at Keyperhaus, even a bekrönender attic door. It is worth seeing two small courtyards, each of which is at number 16 on two streets that can be visited with the front door open. Obere Krämergasse branches from Burgstrasse over Fembogaus crosses Unter Schmidgasse at the Kaiserburg restaurant and joins Bergstrasse, not far from the Tiergartner Torplatz square.
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Sebalder Platz, Nuremberg
Uploaded by Evgeny Praisman
Today's Sebalder Platz, north of the Sebalduskirche, is the venue for the Nuremberg Bardentreffen (German: bards' meeting) is an annual open-air music festival. In earlier centuries, this place was less festive - until 1520, the area was part of the Sebald Cemetery. Almost in the middle of the Platz, there is a memorial plate on the earth mentioning the Moritz chapel built from 1313, which housed a traditional sausage kitchen that delivered food on the bell ringing. One of the six pharmacies that still existed at the end of the imperial city era, the Kugel pharmacy, is located in the house on the east side of the plaza.
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Bratwurst Röslein, Nuremberg
Uploaded by Evgeny Praisman
The Bratwurst means grilled or fried sausage. The Bratwurst Röslein - is the largest bratwurst restaurant in the world was first opened in 1431. Up to 600 guests can be accommodated in four different rooms with a cozy authentic atmosphere. BRATWURST RÖSLEIN is considered the oldest restaurant in the city. Today it is run by the Förster family, which prides itself on the quality of the meat, the quality of the roast, and the number of seats in the restaurant. Pork is delivered to the restaurant's kitchen by farmers in Berching, and Steigerwald, beef comes from Angus Manufaktur Franken. The traditions of roasting meat are transmitted from the grandfather of Herman Förster. Franconian wines come from Rainer Mueller wineries. Beer is brewed by hand at the traditional Tucher brewery. Special Tucher Rotbier from a wooden barrel - made for the restaurant on Schillerplatz.
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Bratwurst Röslein, Nuremberg
Bratwurst Röslein, Nuremberg
During Christmas, the restaurant serves traditional Süppla soup - a strong beef broth with semolina dumplings and pancakes, worth 4.90 euros. Also traditional is semolina soup with two dumplings and vegetables with garlic for 4.90 euros. Homemade dumplings with liver in rich beef broth with fresh parsley for 6.90 euros. Prices ​​are valid for December 2019.
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Bratwurst Röslein, Nuremberg
Bratwurst Röslein, Nuremberg
Beer selection: Draft beer Urbräu, beer Nürnberger Hell Pilsener Urfränkisch Dunkel Zirndorfer, Hefeweizen hell Radler.
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Bratwurst Röslein, Nuremberg
Bratwurst Röslein, Nuremberg
The menu is updated with dishes throughout the year. In winter, one of the most beloved dishes is roasted wild boar from Franconian hunting, stewed in the oven with juniper and cream sauce, garlic, Brussels sprouts, with potato dumplings and cranberries. The cost is 18, 90 € in December 2019.
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Bratwurst Röslein, Nuremberg
Uploaded by Evgeny Praisman
The restaurant is respected among the participants of the traditional summer song festival. For example, a visit to the restaurant by star tenor Andrea Bocelli on August 19 was an event. The Italian has appreciated German cuisine! By the way, then the slogan appeared: Sing, drink and eat like Bocelli. Most of all, the famous tenor liked smoked pork fillet in caraway seeds with wild mushroom sauce on a bruschetta topped with tomatoes. Red mullet with gorgonzola cheese was served as an appetizer.
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Bratwurst Röslein, Nuremberg
Bratwurst Röslein, Nuremberg
Our lunch was drawing to a close. We easily spent almost two hours in the restaurant. It was tasty, comfortable and relatively quiet.
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Nürnberger Christkindlesmarkt
Nürnberger Christkindlesmarkt
At the Christmas market in the central square, they sell so much stuff that you wouldn’t know what first to look for. For example, the famous pencils brand Stadtler. This company was born in Nuremberg, and its products are still popular all over the world.
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Nürnberger Christkindlesmarkt
Nürnberger Christkindlesmarkt
The famous Nuremberg gingerbreads and almonds in sugar are sold everywhere.
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Nürnberger Christkindlesmarkt
Nürnberger Christkindlesmarkt
When the night falls on the city in the most beautiful minutes of the day before the church of St. Mary, the sounds of a brass band are heard. Musicians play Christmas tunes. The orchestra consists of ordinary citizens. These are the traditions in these places.
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Wicklein at Hauptmarkt 7, Nuremberg
Uploaded by Evgeny Praisman
You can buy Nuremberg ' s famous sweetly - spiced Lebkuchen gingerbread - initially a Christmas treat, but now available all year round - at Wicklein at Hauptmarkt 7 ( Mon - Fri 9 . 30am - 6 . 30pm, Sat 9 . 30am - 4 pm). Karl Wicklein took over the management of the company together with Christa Walter (née Wicklein). Both families rebuilt the factory, situated on the Bucher Straße in Nuremberg, which was destroyed in the Second World War. In 1972 Karl Wicklein died, being only 47 years old. Christa`s son, Ernst-August Walter, managed the company from 1972-1988, together with his sister Christa Eder (née Walter). In 1988, the gingerbread- and sweets factory Gottfried Wicklein was taken over by Lebkuchen-Schmidt. Today, Wicklein Lebkuchen is the leading brand for Original Nürnberger Lebkuchen – regionally, nationally and internationally known and loved for a good reason! Till today, the famous Wicklein gingerbread still owes its special flavor to our old recipes, which are true to the traditional handicraft. http://www.wicklein.de/en/
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This monument of the twenty-first infantry
Uploaded by Evgeny Praisman
This monument is dedicated to the fallen and missing soldiers natives of Nuremberg as part of the twenty-first infantry regiment during the Second World War. The history of this regiment has a special symbolism for the inhabitants of Nuremberg. It would have been formed in 1921 after the First World War and equipped with the remnants of the state regiments 45, 46 and 47 and received the Bavarian prefix to its name. Despite this, during the beer coup Hitler in Munich, the regiment remained faithful to state power in Berlin. In 1934, after Hitler came to power, the regiment was divided into the Nuremberg and Bavarian composition.
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Starbucks, Nuremberg
Starbucks, Nuremberg
I don’t know about you, but I don’t go to Starbucks for coffee. But I love the atmosphere there. The coffee here is American - more prominent, catchy, a little hot, incredibly aromatic, and not coffee. But the atmosphere of openness, arbitrariness, idleness, and carelessness is more expensive than any coffee.
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Plaza Ludwig Ludwigsplatz, Nuremberg
Uploaded by Evgeny Praisman
This square is named after the King of Bavaria Ludwig. He was one of the most unusual kings of Germany in the nineteenth century. He built the most beautiful castles that inspired Walt Disney to create his famous castle at the beginning of each cartoon. Ludwig could not live without Wagner's music. Ludwig was deprived of governing the country. He drowned in a lake under unclear circumstances. As a reprise to an unusual king, an unusual fountain is installed in the square. It is called the carousel of family life—his images based on the characters of Hans Sachs - the most famous Nuremberg meistersinger.
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Ehekarussell Nuremberg
Uploaded by Evgeny Praisman
Hans Sachs-Brunnen is a primary architectural fountain in Nuremberg. It is located right at the intersection of the streets of the pedestrian zone. This fountain is also known as Ehekarussell or Ehebrunnen. We are familiar with the oeuvre of Hans Sachs, thanks to the square in his honor in the city. Jorgen Weber - the sculptor of "The Ship of Fools" designed this fountain. By the way, this work was the first and caused much more controversy than the Fools Ship presented four years later in 1988. The storyline of figures at the fountain is based on a poem by Hans Sachs, "Das bittersweet eh' lich Leben," written for the poet's wife. Six groups of figures show the ups and downs of family life from sweety falling in love until bitter quarrels. Hans Sachs is also featured on a pedestal.
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Ehekarussell Nuremberg
Ehekarussell Nuremberg
Scene "Love": A beautiful woman stands together with a young musician on the seashell, and next to them is a jumping goat - a symbol of life and fertility. Scene "Lust." Young spouses bask on a swan bed - a symbol of love and fidelity.
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Ehekarussell Nuremberg
Uploaded by Evgeny Praisman
Scene "Idyll." A caring mother feeds children with apples on a bed in the form of a pelican - a symbol of motherhood. Scene "Routine." The couple remained alone: the exhausted, but dreaming husband and domineering wife eats a piece of cake. Scene "Apogee." Husband and wife are tired of quarrels, but can not live one without another. Scene "Final." A colossal dragon raises a couple of skeletons from the depths of Hell. The couple has already died, but still together in the next world. Further, in a circle of the fountain, you can see again the young woman crawling out of the water, a goat as a symbol of life, and you understand that the carousel of life whirls further.
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Weißer Turm, Nuremberg
Uploaded by Evgeny Praisman
The tower name is derived from the white plastering of the brick masonry that is not preserved. The tower was originally part of the Inner Spittler Gate named after the former Elisabeth Hospital. The gate was probably built around 1250 and originally also served as a toll road. The demolition of the gate planned after the transfer of the imperial city to Bavaria was prevented by the resistance of the citizens of Nuremberg. The medieval church of St Jacob that is clearly seen in front of the withe gate was possessed be Teutonic knights until the first half of the ninth century when Napoleon Bonaparte ordered the Order dissolution.
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Spittlertorturm, Nuremberg
Spittlertorturm, Nuremberg
The Spittler Gate Tower is an old gate in the southwest of the Nuremberg city wall. The gate is fortified by one of the four round main towers of the Nuremberg city fortifications, is named after the Elisabeth Hospital of the Teutonic Order. To the east of the gate, the Nuremberg red light district stretches along the walls until the women's gate.
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Red-lights district Nuremberg
Red-lights district Nuremberg
Prostitution in Germany is legal. Each city has brothels and its own red-light districts.
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Memorial to the victims of National Socialist Underground organisation, Nuremberg
Uploaded by Evgeny Praisman
On June 23, 1999, a flashlight converted to a pipe bomb exploded in a Turkish-born restaurant in Nuremberg. After a lengthy investigation and trial, the federal prosecutor considered this act as "the NSU's first racist, extremist-motivated offense." The so-called National Socialist Underground (NSU) was a neo-Nazi terrorist organization in Germany that was formed around 1999 and aimed to murder people with a migration background based on racist and xenophobic motives. Between 2000 and 2007, they killed nine migrants and one police officer, carried out 43 attempted murders, three bombing attacks, and 15 robberies.
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Way of Human Rights, Nuremberg
Way of Human Rights, Nuremberg
The opposite side of the Human Rights Road in Nuremberg, designed with trees for human rights, has been symbolizing the commitment of society to peaceful, respectful and human rights-based coexistence in the city. The monument exists since 2007.
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Opernhaus, Nuremberg
Opernhaus, Nuremberg
Opernhaus Nürnberg is one of the largest theaters in German. It was built from 1903 to 1905 in Art Nouveau style by the architect Heinrich Seeling. Since 2018, the company's General Music Director is Joana Mallwitz. Her personal contract, announced in October 2017, is for five years. She is the first female conductor to be named General Music Director of the company.
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