Places to visit in Athens

Must have a walking tour in Athens on Feb 12, 2023


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Athens has a rich history and vibrant culture, and a walking tour is a perfect way to experience its many sights and sounds. A one-day walking tour in Athens could start at the Acropolis, visiting the Parthenon and the Erechtheion, two of the city's most iconic landmarks. From there, you can stroll down to the Greek Agora, where you can rest and enjoy a cup of coffee and some local cheese at a small cafe, soaking in the sun and the atmosphere of this historic neighbourhood.

Next, you can head to the flea market and street markets in the Monastiraki neighbourhood. This area is known for its bustling street vendors and street performers, and it's a great place to find souvenirs and local handicrafts. You can take a break from the crowds and sample some delicious pastries at a local patisserie.

Afterwards, you can head to Syntagma Square, where you can watch the Changing of the Guard ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. This is a unique and fascinating tradition that is a must-see for anyone visiting Athens.

As the day turns into night, you can experience the city's vibrant nightlife by visiting some of the popular bars and tavernas in the town. Athens is famous for its nightlife, and there are plenty of bars and tavernas to choose from, offering a variety of music and drinks to suit all tastes.

Finally, to end your day, you can visit one of the city's best restaurants and enjoy a delicious meal with local wines and live music. This is the perfect way to cap off a day of sightseeing and exploring in Athens, surrounded by the city's rich history, vibrant culture, and warm hospitality.

Languages: EN
Author & Co-authors
Evgeny Praisman (author)
Здравствуйте! Меня зовут Женя, я путешественник и гид. Здесь я публикую свои путешествия и путеводители по городам и странам. Вы можете воспользоваться ими, как готовыми путеводителями, так и ресурсом для создания собственных маршрутов. Некоторые находятся в свободном доступе, некоторые открываются по промо коду. Чтобы получить промо код напишите мне сообщение на телефон +972 537907561 или на epraisman@gmail.com и я с радостью вам помогу! Иначе, зачем я всё это делаю?
Distance
5.68 km
Duration
7h 34 m
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78
Places with media
58
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The main gathering point for visiting the Acropolis is typically near the main entrance, which is located at the south slope of the hill. This is where most visitors begin their visit and where tour groups often meet up. The entrance is easily accessible on foot and near the Acropolis Museum. Additionally, several bus and trolley bus stops near the entrance, making it easy to reach by public transportation. Visitors can also take a taxi or drive to the area and park in nearby parking facilities. No matter how you choose to get there, the main entrance of the Acropolis is a convenient gathering point for visitors.

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As of my experience of February 2023, the ticket office for the Acropolis is open every day except for certain national holidays. The hours of operation vary depending on the time of year and the season, but as a general rule, the site is open from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM from April to October and from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM from November to March. It is always a good idea to check the official website or contact the site directly for the most up-to-date information on hours of operation.

Adults: 10 euros Reduced fee: 10 euros (for EU citizens between the ages of 18 and 25) Free admission: for EU citizens under the age of 18 and over the age of 65, and for visitors with disabilities and their carers Please note that these details may have changed, and it is always a good idea to check the official website or contact the site directly for the most up-to-date information on admission fees and hours of operation.

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The entrance turnstile for the Acropolis is where visitors present their admission tickets. After purchasing your ticket at the ticket office, you must pass through the turnstile to enter the site. The turnstile is equipped with technology to scan and validate your ticket, so make sure to have it ready when you approach the entrance. Remember that the turnstile may be busy during peak tourist season, so be prepared to wait in line before entering the site. Keep the ticket to the end of your trip to exit. Once you have passed through the turnstile, you can start visiting the Acropolis and explore this ancient and iconic monument.

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The Beule Gate, also known as the "Beautiful Gate," is a monumental entrance gate located on the south slope of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. The gate dates back to the Roman period, and it was part of the monumental entrance to the Acropolis that was built in the 2nd century AD. The Beule Gate was the main entrance to the Acropolis during the Roman period and was used by visitors and pilgrims who came to worship at the temples and shrines on the hill.

The gate is named after its ornate and decorative design, characteristic of the Roman architectural style. The entrance is made of marble and is adorned with sculpted reliefs, columns, and other decorative elements. Today, the Beule Gate is one of the most recognisable and iconic features of the Acropolis, and it is an integral part of the site's history and cultural heritage. Visitors to the Acropolis can see the Beule Gate as part of their tour and learn more about its history and significance.

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Staying in this place before you go up to the Propileia gate, when elegant Athena Nika temple is above you, imagine the Panathenaic procession. This religious and cultural event took place in ancient Athens. It was held in honour of the goddess Athena, the patron goddess of the city, and was part of the Panathenaic Festival, which was celebrated every four years.

The procession was one of the most critical events in the ancient Athenian calendar and was attended by citizens from all over Greece. Participants would carry a large cloth known as the "peplos" as a gift to the statue of Athena near the Parthenon. The peplos was woven by Athenian maidens and was considered one of the most important symbols of Athenian piety and civic pride.

The procession would start at the Kerameikos Cemetery and make its way to the Acropolis, passing through the Dipylon Gate (also known as the Beule Gate). Along the way, participants would sing hymns and perform dances in honour of Athena.

The Panathenaic procession was a significant event in the cultural and religious life of ancient Athens and provided insight into the beliefs and customs of the ancient Greeks.

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The Temple of Athena Nike is a small temple dedicated to the Greek goddess Athena, located on the southwest corner of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. It was built in the 5th century BCE and is considered one of the best examples of Ionic architecture.

The temple was designed to commemorate the victory of the Athenians over the Persians in the Persian Wars and to honour Athena as a city patron. The temple was built on a bastion, with a stairway leading up to the cella, or inner chamber, which housed a statue of Athena.

The temple is known for its elegant Ionic columns and the frieze that runs along the top of the cella walls, which depicts a battle scene from the Persian Wars. The temple was also decorated with sculptures, including a statue of Nike, the goddess of victory, who was closely associated with Athena.

Today, the Temple of Athena Nike is one of the most well-preserved monuments of the Acropolis and is a popular tourist destination. It provides a glimpse into the architectural and cultural achievements of ancient Greece. It is a testament to the significance of Athena in the religious and cultural life of the Athenians.

Opposite the temple, The Agrippa Pedestal was built in honour of Eumenes II of Pergamon, a Greek king and ally of the Romans. It was located west of the Propylaea of Athens pedestal a large, rectangular platform the same height as the Temple of Athena Nike and was used as a base for a quadriga with the statue of Eumenes.

The Agrippa Pedestal is an example of the many honours and monuments erected in ancient Greece and Rome to commemorate important figures and events. It provides insight into the political and cultural relationships between the Greeks and the Romans and is an essential example of monumental architecture from the Hellenistic and Roman periods.

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The Propylaea was a monumental gateway that served as the entrance to the Acropolis of Athens. The name "Propylaea" means "before the gate" in Greek, and the structure was designed to serve as a grand entrance to the sacred citadel.

The Propylaea was built in the 5th century BCE and is considered one of the most important examples of classical Greek architecture. It was designed by the architect Mnesicles and is characterised by its grand scale, sophisticated use of space, and harmonious balance of form and function.

The Propylaea consists of a central building with two wings on either side, which provided access to the Acropolis. The main building was used as a vestibule, or waiting room, and was decorated with sculptures and friezes depicting the battle between the gods and the giants. The wings provided access to the Acropolis and were used as guard rooms and storage spaces.

The Propylaea was connected to the Library of the Acropolis, located on the slopes of the citadel. The library was one of the most important cultural institutions in ancient Athens. It stores books and manuscripts on various subjects, including history, literature, philosophy, and science.

In summary, the Propylaea was a monumental gateway that served as the entrance to the Acropolis of Athens and was designed to provide grand and impressive access to the sacred citadel. It is considered one of the most important examples of classical Greek architecture and was connected to the Library of the Acropolis.

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The Parthenon is a temple dedicated to the Greek goddess Athena, located on the Acropolis of Athens, Greece. The name "Parthenon" means "virgin's apartment" or "temple of the virgin," referring to Athena, who was the patron goddess of the city and was considered a virgin deity. The Parthenon was built in the 5th century BCE and was designed by the architects Ictinus and Callicrates under the supervision of the famous sculptor Phidias. It is considered one of the greatest masterpieces of classical Greek architecture and is characterised by its harmonious proportions, elegant columns, and intricate sculptures. The temple was decorated with a frieze depicting a procession in honour of Athena, as well as with statues of gods and heroes.

In addition to serving as a temple to Athena, the Parthenon was also used as a treasury in ancient Athens. The temple was used to store the city's wealth and valuable offerings, as well as the proceeds from the Delian League, a coalition of Greek city-states led by Athens and was dedicated to the defence of Greece against the Persians. The league was financed through tribute payments from its member states, and the funds were stored in the Parthenon.

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The Parthenon was damaged during the Greek War of Independence in the early 19th century when the Acropolis was used as a fortress by the Ottoman Turks. The temple was hit by a cannonball during the siege of Athens and sustained significant damage to its columns and sculptures.

Even previously, Parthenon suffered significant damage during the siege of 1687 and was reduced to ruins.

The siege of 1687 was part of the Morean War, also known as the Venetian-Ottoman War, which took place between 1684 and 1699. The war was fought between the Ottoman Empire and the Republic of Venice, with the latter receiving support from several European powers, including the Holy League and the Habsburg Monarchy.

Ottoman forces bombarded the city of Athens and the Acropolis, which housed the Parthenon. The explosion caused by the bombardment crumpled the Parthenon into ruins, marking a significant turning point in its history. The damage to the Parthenon was extensive, and the temple would continue to deteriorate in the centuries to come due to natural weathering, looting, and neglect.

The siege of 1687 was a significant event in the history of the Parthenon and the city of Athens, and it had a lasting impact on the temple's preservation and condition.

Despite restoration efforts in the early 1900s, iron-reinforced concrete and clamps caused further damage to the ancient marble and led to structural problems.

In 1983, the restoration of the Parthenon began. On the eastern side, the project included restoring the two corners of the entablature and pediment, transferring original metopes to the new Acropolis Museum and replacing them with exact copies. During work in the pronaos, three northern columns were partially restored using material from their original position and the fourth and fifth columns were fully restored with new marble. In 2015, the final carving of their flutes was completed.

Restoring the northern colonnade involved correcting previous misalignments and restoring eight central columns and the corresponding entablature. Using ancient members and titanium reinforcements helped revive the Parthenon's original form.

Work on the cella's long walls began in 2011, intending to define the plan of the cella by incorporating scattered ancient stones. After completion, the two walls will match their original form as they appeared just after the 1687 explosion. Work on the external and internal layer of the North wall's orthostatic has also been carried out since 2011 to support the overlying blocks of the wall.

In conclusion, the Parthenon was a temple dedicated to the goddess Athena and was one of the most important religious and cultural centres in ancient Athens. It was also used as a treasury to store the city's wealth and the proceeds from the Delian League. The Parthenon is considered a masterpiece of classical Greek architecture and was damaged during the Greek War of Independence in the 19th century.

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East of the Parthenon lay the foundations of a small building attributed by the first excavators of the Acropolis to the Temple of Rome and the Roman Emperor Octavian Augustus. The association of the foundations with the temple stems from the discovery in the area of many marble architectural members, as well as of the architrave bearing the incised dedicatory inscription. The architectural members indicate that the Temple of Rome and Augustus was of the lonic order, circular and monopteral - namely that it featured a single circular colonnade made of nine columns (pteron), without a walled room inside (cella). Its diameter measured ca. 8.60 m., and its height reached 7.30 m up to the conical roof. The temple's construction is associated with the architect who repaired the Erechtheion in the Roman Period because the architectural details of its members replicate those of the Erechtheion. It is possible that the temple interior housed statues of Rome and Augustus, although no fragments of sculptures have been identified to date. The temple of Rome and Augustus is the sole Roman temple on the Acropolis and the only Athenian temple dedicated to the cult of the Emperor. The Athenian deme (people) constructed it to propitiate Octavian August and reverse the hostile climate that characterised the relations of the two parties, as, during the Roman civil wars, the city of Athens had supported his opponent, Marcus Antonius. The temple is securely dated after 27 B.C., when Octavian was proclaimed Augustus - most probably between 19 and 17 B.C.

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The Acropolis Viewing Point provides stunning views in several directions. When facing the mount of Lykabettos, you can see the hill rising above Athens, covered in greenery and offering a peaceful contrast to the bustling city below.

Turning to the left, you will see the Agora, once the centre of public life in ancient Athens. In the centre of the Agora stands the Temple of Hephaestus, a well-preserved ancient Greek temple dedicated to the god of fire and metalworking.

Continuing to the right, you will see the Panathenaic Stadium, used for athletic competitions in ancient Greece, including the first modern Olympic Games in 1896. The stadium has been beautifully restored and is now used for sporting events and concerts.

Finally, if you look straight ahead, you will see the temple of Zeus, one of the largest temples in ancient Greece, dedicated to the king of the gods. The temple was never completed, but its impressive ruins still stand today, showcasing the grandeur of ancient Greek architecture.

From the Acropolis Viewing Point, you can also see the cliffs of the Acropolis, which rise dramatically above the city and provide a natural fortress for the ancient citadel. The ridges are dotted with old buildings and monuments, including the Parthenon and the Erechtheion, all visible from the Acropolis Viewing Point.

As for the flagpole, the national flag of Greece is typically displayed at the top of the Acropolis, waving proudly over the ancient ruins and offering a symbol of the country's rich history and cultural heritage.

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Zeus Polieus was the patron deity of Athens, worshipped as the guardian and protector of the city. The Sanctuary of Zeus Polieus was located on the northern slope of the Acropolis. Today, only scattered ruins and foundations remain of the sanctuary. Despite the lack of visible remains, the name "Zeus Polieus" serves as a reminder of the religious and cultural heritage of ancient Athens. The Parthenon, located on the eastern end of the Acropolis, is one of the most well-preserved old Greek buildings visible and dominant on the ruins of the small sanctuary of Zeus.

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The Erechtheion and the Parthenon are ancient Greek temples on the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. While both are masterpieces of ancient Greek architecture, there are several key differences between the two buildings.

One of the most notable differences is the style of architecture. The Erechtheion is an example of the Ionic order, characterised by its tall, slender columns with fluted shafts and elaborate capitals. The Parthenon, on the other hand, is an example of the Doric order, which is characterised by its sturdy columns with plain shafts and simple capitals.

Another difference is the purpose of the buildings. The Erechtheion was dedicated to both Athena and Poseidon and was used for religious rituals. In contrast, the Parthenon was dedicated to Athena and was used as a temple and a treasury.

The decoration of the two buildings is also different. The Erechtheion is famous for its Porch of the Caryatids, supported by six sculpted female figures known as caryatids. The Parthenon is renowned for its frieze, which depicts scenes from the legendary past of Athens, and its sculptures, which were all likely made by the same workshop that made the Parthenon sculptures.

Finally, the Erechtheion and the Parthenon were built at different times. The Erechtheion was constructed before the outbreak of the Peloponnesian War or after the conclusion of the "Peace of Nikias." At the same time, the Parthenon was built during the height of Athens's power and prosperity in the 5th century BCE.

In conclusion, while both the Erechtheion and the Parthenon are iconic structures on the Acropolis in Athens, they are different in terms of architecture, purpose, decoration, and construction time.

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The Erechtheion, an elegant building of the Ionic order, takes its name from Erechtheus, the mythical king of Athens. According to later literary sources, construction of the temple began either before the outbreak of the Peloponnesian War in 431 BCE or after the conclusion of the "Peace of Nikias" in 421 BCE. However, works were interrupted due to the war and were only completed in 406 BCE. The peculiar layout of the building is a result of the natural irregularity of the ground and the need to incorporate ancient sacred spots, such as the salt spring that appeared when Poseidon struck the rock with his trident during his contest with Athena over the patronage of the city, the trident marks, and the tombs of the Athenian kings Kekrops and Erechtheus.

The interior of the Erechtheion is divided into two sections by a wall. The eastern section, which is at least 3 meters higher than the western section, was dedicated to Athena Polias and housed the xoanon, an ancient wooden cult statue of the goddess. The western section was divided into three parts and dedicated to the cult of Poseidon Erechtheus, Hephaistus, and the hero Boutes.

The north side of the cella features a magnificent porch with six Ionic columns. The bases, capitals, and frame of the doorway leading to the interior of the cella are decorated with elaborate reliefs, while the ceiling coffers were painted. The famous Porch of the Caryatids or Maidens dominates the south side of the building. Six statues of young women, standing on a 1.77 meter high podium, support the roof of the porch, which was part of Kekrops' tomb above the ground.

The upper part of the building features a frieze of grey Eleusinian stone with relief figures of white Parian marble attached to it. Today, these relief figures are exhibited in the Acropolis Museum.

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The temple located south of the Erechtheion, in front of caryatides, which today only preserves its foundations, was known as the "Old Temple", according to epigraphic evidence. This Archaic temple was dedicated to Athena Polias, the city's patron deity. It housed the xoanon, the wooden cult statue of the goddess, to which the Athenians offered peplos during the Panathenaic festival. The western section of the temple, consisting of three smaller parts, may have housed the cults of other divinities, such as Hephaistus, Poseidon-Erechtheus, and the hero Boutes.

The "Old Temple" stood on the site once occupied by the palace of the Mycenaean ruler of Attica and replaced a smaller Geometric temple, also dedicated to Athena Polias, that was built in the 8th century BCE. The only remains of this early temple are two stone column bases and a bronze disc featuring an image of Gorgo, which adorned the pediment or the tip of the roof in the 7th century BCE.

The "Old Temple" was a Doric peripteral building with six columns at the front and rear end and 12 columns at the sides. Measuring 43.44 x 21.43 meters, the temple was built using porous stone, while some upper parts, such as the metopes, pedimental sculptures, and tiles, were made of Parian marble. One pediment was adorned with a sculpted group depicting the Gigantomachy (the battle between the Olympian gods and the rebellious Giants). At the same time, the other featured a partially preserved group of lions devouring a bull. The altar, which is no longer present, was located east of the temple, as indicated by some cuttings on the rock.

The "Old Temple" was built between 525 and 500 BCE and is associated with either the sons of the tyrant Peisistratos or the Athenian people at the time of the establishment of democracy by Kleisthenes. It was destroyed during the Persian invasion in 480 BCE, and many of its architectural elements were later incorporated into the north wall of the Acropolis.

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The Pandroseion, a sanctuary dedicated to Pandrosos, was established north of the Old Temple of Athena during the Archaic Period. Pandrosos was the daughter of the legendary king of Athens, Kekrops, and was the first priestess of Athena Polias, the city's patron goddess.

The Pandroseion was founded in an area of the Acropolis that preserved the oldest sacred spots of the Athenians, such as the signs of the contest between Athena and Poseidon for the patronage of the city, the sacred olive tree that sprang from the rock when Athena struck it with her spear, the salty spring that appeared when Poseidon struck his trident, and the tomb of King Kekrops, who was the judge or witness of the contest between the two gods.

The sacred olive tree of Athena was enclosed in the Pandroseion sanctuary, while a separate precinct wall protected King Kekrops' tomb to the southeast. The early Pandroseion, whose form is unknown, was destroyed by the Persians in 480 BCE. Today, a few remains of the classical sanctuary can be found at the west wall of the Erechtheion and parts of the foundation of its north boundary. These remains indicate that the sanctuary was an open-air trapezoidal structure with a stoa of the Ionic order on the north side and an entrance through a small propylon at the east end of the stoa. The altar of Herkeios Zeus, protector of the family, was located in the court.

The Pandroseion underwent alterations when the Erechtheion was attached to its east side (431-406 BCE or 421-406 BCE). The entrance to the sanctuary was then through a small, undecorated door to the right of the elaborate access of the north porch of the Erechtheion, and the two sanctuaries were also directly connected by a small door in the west wall of the Erechtheion. At that time, the sanctuary court was repaved, and part of King Kekrops' tomb was integrated under the porch of the Caryatids. The olive tree in the sanctuary today was planted at the beginning of the 20th century in memory of Athena's sacred tree.

After all, Erchtheon is a complicated sanctuary dedicated to several persons in ancient mythology.

King Kekrops was a mythical king of Athens in ancient Greek mythology. He was said to be the first ruler of the city and the son of the earth goddess Gaia. Kekrops was known for his role as the judge or witness of the contest between Athena and Poseidon, two gods who were competing for the patronage of the city. According to the myth, when Athena struck the rock with her spear, an olive tree sprouted, giving her victory, and a salty spring appeared when Poseidon struck his trident. The tomb of King Kekrops was protected by a separate precinct wall in the Pandroseion sanctuary on the Acropolis. He is remembered in history as a significant figure in the early myths of Athens.

Poseidon-Erechtheus combines two mythological figures in ancient Greek religion - Poseidon, the god of the sea, and Erechtheus, a legendary king of Athens. According to the myth, Erechtheus was said to be a son of the earth goddess Gaia and a son-in-law of Poseidon.

In some versions of the myth, Poseidon and Erechtheus were worshipped together as a single deity, with Poseidon being identified as the god of the sea and Erechtheus as the god of the earth. This combination was believed to have symbolised the unity of the two realms, the sea and the land, and was worshipped as a protector of Athens.

The cult of Poseidon-Erechtheus was located in the western section of the Erechtheion temple on the Acropolis in Athens. This temple was dedicated to the cult of several divinities, including Poseidon-Erechtheus, Hephaistus, and the hero Boutes. The temple was built to house the ancient sacred spots of the city, such as the salt spring that appeared when Poseidon struck the rock with his trident and the trident marks and the tombs of the Athenian kings Kekrops and Erechtheus.

Boutes was a hero in ancient Greek mythology. He was associated with the city of Athens and was worshipped as a local hero.

Very little is known about Boutes and his mythology, but he was believed to be a son of the earth goddess Gaia and a mortal man. He was said to have been a great athlete. He was associated with athletic games, particularly the Panathenaic festival, held in Athens in honour of the goddess Athena.

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The area between the Propylaia and the Erechtheion was dominated by the colossal bronze statue of Athena, known as Athena Promachos. This statue was made by the renowned sculptor Pheidias and was dedicated to Athena by the Athenians to express their gratitude for her contribution to the victories in the Persian Wars. The exact form of the statue is not known, but later copies and coins from the Roman Period show the goddess standing in a calm pose, wearing a belted peplos, and holding a Nike or an owl in her outstretched right hand. Pausanias mentions that the shield of the statue was decorated with scenes from the Centauromachy, executed by the bronze sculptor Mys and drawn by the painter Parrhasios. The statue was approximately 9 meters tall, including the pedestal, and was visible to sailors off Cape Sounion. The statue was carried to Constantinople and was placed at the hippodrome, but was destroyed by the crowd during the siege of the city by the Franks in 1204.

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Opposite the Athena Nike Temple stands the monument dedicated by the Athenians to Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, son-in-law and general of the Roman Emperor Octavian Augustus, includes a tall pedestal located west of the Propylaea. Originally, the pedestal supported a bronze life-size quadriga, but only the pedestal made of gray Hymmetian marble and Pentelic marble at the base and crown remains today, standing at a total height of 8.9 m. The western face of the pedestal features an incised honorary inscription that recognizes Agrippa as a benefactor of the city. This dedication was made between 27 B.C. and 12 B.C., during which time Agrippa was consul for the third time and died.

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The Areopagus Hill is a prominent rock outcropping located northwest of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. The name Areopagus comes from the Greek "Areios Pagos," which means "Hill of Ares," the god of war. According to Greek mythology, Ares was tried on this hill for the murder of Poseidon's son, Alirrothios.

In ancient times, the Areopagus was a place where trials were held, particularly for cases involving murder, and it served as the highest court of appeal for the city of Athens. The court was composed of members of the aristocracy, who were elected for life and were known as the Areopagites. The court of the Areopagus was highly respected for its fairness and impartiality, and its rulings were considered to be final.

The origins of the Areopagus Hill can be traced back to the Mycenaean period, around 1600-1100 BCE. The hill became a place of significance during the 6th century BCE, when it was used as a site for the city's legal system. The Areopagus continued to be used as a court until the Roman period, and it was also used as a meeting place for the city's aristocracy.

In addition to its legal and political significance, the Areopagus also has a rich cultural and religious tradition. According to the New Testament, the Apostle Paul delivered a famous sermon on the hill in the 1st century CE, which led to the conversion of several Athenians to Christianity. Today, the Areopagus is a popular tourist destination and is known for its stunning views of Athens and the surrounding areas.

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Despite the current association with Agrippa, the monument was not initially intended for him. Evidence such as the architectural features of the pedestal, technical details on its upper surface, and traces of an earlier defaced inscription suggest that the monument was erected in the first half of the second century B.C. and originally held the chariot of one of the Pergamene kings, possibly Eumenes I or Attalus I. The deme dedicated the monument to commemorate a victory by the Pergamene Kings in a chariot race during the Panathenaic Games. The Pergamene Kings also benefacted the city by funding the construction of two significant public buildings: the Stoa of Eumenes located south of the Acropolis and the Stoa of Attalus in the Athenian Agora.

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The intersection of Theoriou and Dioskouron streets in Athens is located at the foot of the Acropolis hill, near the ancient Agora. For those descending from the Acropolis, the intersection marks the start of the pedestrian-only street of Apostolou Pavlou, which runs along the ancient walls of the city and offers a scenic walk with stunning views.

In ancient times, the road that connected the Acropolis and the Agora was known as the Panathenaic Way. This was the main route taken during the Panathenaic festival, which was held in honor of the goddess Athena and involved a grand procession from the Agora to the Acropolis. The Panathenaic Way was lined with statues and monuments, and it was also used for other important processions and ceremonies.

Today, the Panathenaic Way is no longer a continuous route, but parts of it have been excavated and can still be seen in the form of ancient stones and columns along the modern streets of Athens. The intersection of Theoriou and Dioskouron streets marks the starting point of this historic route and serves as a reminder of Athens' rich cultural heritage.

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Castor and Pollux, also known as the Dioscuri, are twin half-brothers in Greek and Roman mythology. Their mother was Leda, and they had different fathers, with Castor being the mortal son of King Tyndareus of Sparta and Pollux being the divine son of Zeus, who conceived him in the form of a swan. This makes them an example of heteropaternal superfecundation.

The birth of the twins is described differently in various accounts, but they are sometimes said to have been born from an egg along with their twin sisters Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. In Latin, the twins are called the Gemini, meaning "twins", as well as the Castores and Tyndaridae or Tyndarids.

Pollux was so devoted to his brother that he asked Zeus to allow them to share his immortality so they could remain together. They were then transformed into the constellation Gemini. The twins were revered as the patrons of sailors, appearing as St. Elmo's fire, and were associated with horsemanship, reflecting their origin as the Indo-European horse twins.

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The Gate of Athena Archegetis stands resplendent, its marble columns and architrave casting long shadows in the Athenian sun. Built in 11 BCE by the magnanimous Julius Caesar and Augustus, it was a gift to the people of Athens, a symbol of their patroness Athena Archegetis.

The dedicatory inscription on the monument offers a glimpse into the rich history of the time. It tells of the soldiers of Eukles from Marathon, who stood vigilant, safeguarding the temple and the city. It speaks of Herod, a proud and noble man who watched over the temple with steadfast devotion. And it says of Nicias, the archon, son of Sarapion, who was an ambassador of the demos of Athmonon.

The Gate of Athena Archegetis is situated on the western side of the Roman Agora. It is considered the second most prominent remnant of the ancient city, second only to the magnificent Tower of the Winds. It is a testament to the grandeur of ancient Athens, a city steeped in rich history and cultural heritage.

So let us stand in awe of the Gate of Athena Archegetis, a symbol of a great and proud people, a monument to their achievements, and a reminder of the rich heritage that we have inherited.

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The Library of Pantainos stands on the eastern side of the Panathenaic way, south of the Stoa of Attalos. It comprises a spacious square room and a cobblestone courtyard encircled by three stoas with shops hidden behind their colonnades. The northern stoa extends to the east, along the southern edge of a marble street that once led from the Agora to the Doric gateway of the market of Caesar and Augustus, also known as the Roman Agora.

According to an inscribed marble lintel block, the library was dedicated to Athena Archegetis, the emperor Trajan, and the people of Athens in around 100 A.D. by Titus Flavius Pantainos, who identifies himself as both a priest of the philosophical muses and the son of the head of a philosophical school. The library rules, much like those of today, were recorded in another inscription found within the building: "No book is to be taken out since we have sworn an oath. The library will be open from the first hour until the sixth."

Trajan appeared to be worshipped in the building, as parts of his statue were discovered among the ruins. The remains of the library support the theory that this site may have housed not only the Library of Pantainos but also one of the renowned philosophical schools of Athens.

In 267 A.D., the northern and western stoas were destroyed by the Herulians. In the 5th century A.D., the eastern stoa was reconstructed and expanded with a second story for the eastern two-thirds of its length. The rooms behind the arcade on the ground level were also refurbished to serve as a basement suite for the main rooms on the upper floor, which included a small peristyle court, an apsidal room, and bathing facilities. This large building was likely used as an official residence.

Take a moment to admire the majestic acroteria and charming window located on Pikilis street before turning right and heading down the Stoa of Attalos.

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Sitting outside at the Dioskuroi tavern in Greece at noon is a delightful experience, surrounded by the bright and warm sun. The bustling pedestrian street adds to the lively atmosphere, while the outdoor seating area offers a peaceful escape from the hustle and bustle.

The table is set with plates of delicious cheeses, fresh bread, and tangy dips, all made from locally-sourced ingredients. The sun shines on you as you savour each bite of the new and flavorful food. The breeze carries the scent of the sea, and the street sounds to your table, adding to the lively atmosphere.

As you dine, you feel a sense of peace and contentment. The warm sun and the fresh air invigorate your feelings, and you can relax and savour the moment. There's no need to hurry or rush, no place you need to be. This is a time to bask in the simple pleasures of life, surrounded by the warm sun, the sounds of the street, and the friendly atmosphere of the Dioskuroi tavern.

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The Ancient Agora of Athens, where the Stoa of Attalos is located, is usually open from 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM. However, it is always best to check the official website or contact the local tourist information centre for the most up-to-date information regarding visiting hours.

The Ancient Agora is a truly excellent site, offering a unique glimpse into the heart of ancient Athens. Visitors can explore the well-preserved remains of the market, including the Stoa of Attalos, a grand collonaded building that once housed shops and offices. The Agora was once a bustling centre of daily life, and visitors can still see the remains of temples, public buildings, and private homes, offering a fascinating glimpse into the social and political life of ancient Athens.

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The Ancient Agora of Athens is home to several excellent sites that offer a unique glimpse into the heart of ancient Athens. Some of the most notable areas within the Agora include:

The Stoa of Attalos: a grand collonaded building that once housed shops and offices The Temple of Hephaestus: a well-preserved temple dedicated to the god of blacksmiths and metalworkers The Tholos: a circular structure that was used as a dining hall for politicians The Monument of the Eponymous Heroes: a stone column that once displayed the names of the ten tribes of Athens The Altar of the Twelve Gods: a stone altar dedicated to the twelve principal gods of the ancient Greek pantheon From the gate of the Ancient Agora, visitors can glimpse the well-preserved ruins and imagine what life was like in ancient Athens. However, it is essential to note that the experience of exploring the site is greatly enhanced by entering and exploring the ruins up close.

The fact that the Ancient Agora is open only until 3:00 PM can disadvantage visitors with limited time to explore the site. It is always best to check the official website or contact the local tourist information centre for the most up-to-date information regarding visiting hours and plan your visit accordingly. Regardless of the visiting hours, the Ancient Agora of Athens is a fantastic site that will leave a lasting impression on all who visit.

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The ruins before you are believed to be those of the Stoa Poikile, a collonaded building dating back to around 475-465 BC. In ancient Greek architecture, a stoa was a long building with columns, and the Stoa Poikile was adorned with Doric columns outside and Ionic columns within.

The building was named for the beautiful wooden panel paintings that adorned its walls soon after construction. These paintings, among the most famous in antiquity, depicted Athenian military triumphs, both mythical and historical. However, by 400 AD, a Roman proconsul had removed the paintings, and they no longer survived.

The Stoa Poikile was also famous as the classroom of the philosopher Zeno, who came to Athens around 300 BC. He and his followers, known as the Stoics, regularly met here.

Behind the Stoa Poikile is a shop building that was originally built around 420 BC and was used until the 5th century AD, with alterations. Both the Stoa Poikile and the shops were abandoned by the 6th century, and their remains were covered by a neighbourhood of houses and shops dating from the 10th to the 12th centuries AD.

The area is part of the Ancient Athenian Agora, excavated in 1931 by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens in cooperation with the Hellenic Ministry of Culture's Ephorate of Antiquities of Athens. Funding for the excavation comes from private American sources, notably the Packard Humanities Institute.

The Flea Market in Athens is a wonderful place where one can find kerosene lamps, copper scales to weigh envelopes and determine the cost of sending letters, and brass objects.

On Sundays, antique dealers from all over gather at the Flea Market to display their collections. They mostly offer military memorabilia, Russian samovars, and uniform items.

At the market's permanent shops, one can find chandeliers, furniture, and church utensils.

One of the permanent shops at the flea market in Athens worth mentioning is this one. Here, you can find real gems of pottery, glassware, furniture, household items, as well as statues and toys. It's a fascinating place to visit! The flea market is a great way to find unique and authentic items that give your home a personal style and atmosphere. I hope you'll be able to find something here that will delight and complement your collection.

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Acroteria are decorative elements placed on the roofs of ancient Greek and Roman temples and other important buildings. The name "acroteria" comes from the Greek word "akros," meaning "at the highest point," and refers to the location of these elements on the roof of a building.

Acroteria served both a decorative and functional purpose. They were used to enhance the appearance of a building and to protect the corners of the roof from water damage. Acroteria came in various shapes and sizes, ranging from simple rectangular blocks to elaborate sculptures depicting gods, heroes, or other figures. In ancient Greece, acroteria were often made of marble and decorated with relief sculptures. In contrast, in ancient Rome, they were made of bronze or other metal materials and were more ornate.

In the Acropolis of Athens, acroteria can be seen on several ancient buildings, including the Parthenon and the Erechtheion. Today, acroteria can still be seen on many old buildings and are an important reminder of the architectural traditions of ancient Greece and Rome.

Acroteria are not used in the same way today as in ancient times. Still, they continue to be an essential part of the architectural heritage of the ancient world and are studied and appreciated by scholars and tourists alike.

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Ifestou street is a market street in Athens. It is the closest market street to the flea market that has been a part of Athens' history for many years and is known for offering a diverse range of goods, including antiques, vintage items, handmade crafts, and more.

Market markets in Athens are popular destinations for both locals and tourists, and it's not uncommon for them to be busy and crowded, especially during peak tourist season.

In terms of the goods that can be found at Ifestou street, you can expect a variety of items, including vintage and antique furniture, clothing and accessories, ceramics, glassware, jewelry, and much more. The street is also known for its street vendors selling handcrafted goods, such as leather goods, handmade jewelry, and other souvenirs.

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Monastiraki Square is a bustling and vibrant hub of activity in Athens, Greece. Located in the city's heart, it is known for its mix of historical and modern elements, including its iconic church and nearby metro station. The square is a popular gathering place for locals and tourists alike, and it is not uncommon to see large crowds gathering here, especially on weekends and holidays.

One of the defining features of Monastiraki Square is its long sun shadows created by the surrounding buildings and structures. The shadows provide a dramatic contrast to the bright, sunny atmosphere of the square, giving it a unique and memorable look.

Whether shopping for souvenirs, exploring the nearby historic sites, or simply soaking up the atmosphere, Monastiraki Square is a must-visit destination for anyone visiting Athens. With its mix of history, culture, and modernity, it truly captures the essence of this vibrant city.

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Bairaktaris taverna is a well-known eatery near Monastiraki Square in Athens, Greece. The taverna is known for its traditional Greek cuisine, including dishes such as souvlaki, moussaka, and tzatziki, as well as its warm and inviting atmosphere.

On either side of Ermou street, you can find similar tavernas offering a similar experience. These tavernas typically have outdoor seating areas where you can enjoy your meal while enjoying the sights and sounds of the bustling city. The atmosphere is lively and relaxed, making them the perfect place to enjoy a delicious meal and soak up the local culture.

In the vicinity of Monastiraki Square, there is also an art street gallery that opens only on Sundays. This is an excellent opportunity for art lovers to explore the works of local artists and to purchase unique and original pieces to take home as a souvenir. The gallery is a hub of creative energy, with artists and art enthusiasts coming together to celebrate the city's rich cultural heritage. Whether you're a seasoned art collector or just looking for something unique to take home, this art street gallery is worth a visit.

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Attica Artopoiia Cafe may be named also Attica Bakery Pastries a cafe chain operating in Athens, Greece. It is known for its focus on art and culture, offering a cosy and intimate atmosphere for visitors to enjoy a drink pastries or a light meal.

The cafes offer a variety of coffee, tea, and other beverages, as well as light snacks and pastries. They are decorated with works of photography art, making them an excellent destination for atmosphere and pastries lovers.

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Saint Barbara Church (also known as Saint Barbara Chapel) in Athens, Greece. It is a small church near the Church of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary, also known as Panagia Kapnikarea.

Saint Barbara Church is known for its historical significance and architectural beauty, and it is a popular destination for tourists and religious pilgrims. The church dates back to the 11th century and is considered one of the oldest and most well-preserved churches in Athens. It features a unique architectural style that combines elements of Byzantine and post-Byzantine design.

The church is located in the heart of Athens and is surrounded by bustling streets and cafes, making it an excellent destination for those who want to explore the city's rich history and cultural heritage. Whether you are interested in architecture, history, or religion, Saint Barbara Church is a must-visit destination for anyone visiting Athens.

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Matsuoka is a famous coffee shop on Ermou Street in Athens, Greece. Known for its wide selection of fruits, snacks, sweets, and more, it is a favourite among visitors and locals. Customers can choose from various items, and the friendly staff can always assist and provide recommendations. Those who have visited Matsuoka are raving about their superb selection and helpful staff, making it a must-visit destination for anyone visiting Athens. Whether you are looking for unique treats or need a snack, Matsuoka is the place to go.

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The intersection of Voulis and Ermou streets is in the heart of Athens, Greece. Voulis is a major street in the city centre, and Ermou is a well-known shopping street, making the intersection a busy and popular area. In this area, you can find a variety of shops, cafes, restaurants, and other businesses catering to locals and tourists. The busy and lively atmosphere of the Voulis and Ermou intersection makes it a popular spot for shopping, dining, and people-watching. Whether you want to shop, grab a bite to eat, or explore the city, this intersection is worth a visit.

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Syntagma Square, located in the heart of Athens, Greece, is a vibrant hub of activity and a must-visit destination for anyone visiting the city. The square takes its name from the Greek word "συνταγμα," meaning "constitution," and was named after the first Greek Constitution was proclaimed there in 1843. With its rich history and cultural significance, Syntagma Square has been a centre of political and cultural life in Athens for many years.

In the evening, the square comes alive with the lights and the sun setting, creating a magical and romantic atmosphere. Visitors can stroll through the square, watch street performers, or sit at a café and enjoy the view. The square is surrounded by historic buildings and monuments, including the Greek Parliament building, making it a popular spot for sightseeing and people-watching.

Whether you are interested in history or culture or want to experience the city's bustling energy, Syntagma Square is a must-visit destination in Athens. With its stunning architecture, beautiful gardens, and vibrant atmosphere, Syntagma Square will highlight your visit to Athens.

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The Fountain in Syntagma Square, Athens, Greece, is a work of the German architect Ernst Ziller. Ziller was a prominent architect in Athens during the late 19th and early 20th centuries and was responsible for designing many important buildings and monuments in the city, including the fountain in Syntagma Square.

The fountain, located in the centre of the square, is a beautifully designed and ornate structure that serves as a focal point for the square and its surroundings. It is made of marble and has simple geometric decorative elements.

Ernst Ziller was known for his attention to detail and his ability to combine classical and modern elements in his designs, and these qualities are evident in the fountain in Syntagma Square. The fountain is beautiful and impressive by its simplicity of art and is a testament to Ziller's skill as an architect and his contributions to the cultural heritage of Athens.

Whether you are interested in history or architecture or want to experience the beauty of Athens, the fountain in Syntagma Square is a must-visit destination. It is a beautiful and iconic landmark and will surely be a highlight of your visit to the city.

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The Monument to the Unknown Soldier in Athens, Greece, is a memorial dedicated to the Greek soldiers who lost their lives in service to their country. The monument is located in Syntagma Square and is one of the most important and recognisable landmarks in Athens.

The monument was erected in 1932 to honour the thousands of Greek soldiers who died in World War I and the subsequent struggles for Greek independence. The central feature of the monument is a marble tomb, which houses the remains of an unknown soldier who died in battle. Two evzones guard the tomb, members of the Presidential Guard, who stand watch in traditional uniform and perform a solemn changing of the guard ceremony every hour.

The Monument to the Unknown Soldier symbolises the sacrifices made by Greek soldiers to serve their country. It serves as a reminder of the cost of freedom and independence. It is also a tribute to the bravery and sacrifice of all soldiers who have lost their lives to defend their country.

The monument is a place of national pride and respect and is a popular destination for Greeks and tourists alike. It is a beautiful and moving memorial and is a testament to the bravery and sacrifices made by Greek soldiers in defence of their country. Whether you are interested in history or culture or want to experience the beauty of Athens, the Monument to the Unknown Soldier is a must-visit destination.

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The picturesque church of Agia Dynamis, also known as the Holy Power of the Virgin, is located at the intersection of Metropoleos and Pentelis streets in Athens. It is situated in a neighborhood that was once called "Rodakio." This small church, which is surrounded by the modern Electra Metropolis Hotel, belongs to the type of one-aisle vaulted basilicas and is decorated with murals depicting various saints and scenes from the Bible.

According to legend, the church was built in the 16th century over the ruins of an ancient temple of Hercules and was the Metohi of the Penteli Monastery. The church's name, Agia Dynamis, refers to the Virgin Mary and was given to the church to ensure that pregnant women in Athens would give birth to strong children. The church is also said to have been used as a hiding place for priests and church treasures during the Turkish occupation, and as a passage for ammunition during the War of Independence.

The church honors the birth of the Virgin Mary and is viewed as a symbol of spiritual empowerment and moral resistance. The extensive renovations of the former Ministry of Education building, which once stood atop the church, were completed in 2016 and transformed the building into the grand 216-room Electra Metropolis Hotel.

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"Mamachita" is a restaurant that serves both Mexican tacos, or "taqueria," and cocktails, or "cocteleria." This unique combination offers diners the opportunity to enjoy the flavours of Mexican cuisine, along with a variety of mixed drinks, in a single location. The menu at Mamachita may include a variety of tacos filled with ingredients such as meats, vegetables, and cheeses, as well as classic cocktails and creative mixed drinks made with a range of spirits, juices, and other ingredients.

With its combination of taqueria and cocteleria, Mamachita offers a fun and lively atmosphere where diners can enjoy delicious food and drinks in a casual setting. Whether you're in the mood for a delicious taco or a refreshing cocktail, Mamachita is the perfect place to satisfy your cravings.

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The Skaperdas House in Athens belonged to the Skaperdas Fur Firm, a family business established in 1912 by Spyros Skaperdas. Spyros, who originated from Kastoria, a town with a rich history in fur manufacturing and trading, possessed the skill of manual sewing. He opened the first shop on Ermou Street, the most commercial road in Athens. From the start, the Skaperdas Fur Firm offered unique handmade fur garments made-to-measure, as well as selected imported products from famous European firms. Additionally, the firm provided safekeeping and repair services for clothes.

In 2012, the Skaperdas Fur Firm celebrated 100 years since its establishment, with the fourth generation of the family now working there. The company has recorded two significant achievements: the first collection of handmade accessories and exporting of products to European countries.

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Agios Filothei Street in Athens is named after Saint Agia Filothei, a prominent Christian figure from the 16th century who hailed from the aristocratic Benizelos family during the Turkish occupation. After she was widowed at a young age, she established the Agios Andreas monastery, called the "Parthenon", as it served as a refuge for young, poor women who were taught a trade without being required to become nuns. Tragically, Saint Agia Filothei was murdered by the Turks in a martyrdom.

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The Stoa of Agios Philothei and the Archbishop's House are separate buildings in Athens, Greece.

The Stoa of Agios Philothei is a covered walkway or colonnade dedicated to Saint Philothei, a martyr and patron saint of Athens. The stoa was built in the 16th century and served as a place of worship and a shelter for the poor and homeless.

The Archbishop's House, on the other hand, is the official residence of the Archbishop of Athens and serves as the headquarters for the Greek Orthodox Church in Athens. The house is located in the centre of Athens and has a rich history dating back several centuries.

Both the Stoa of Agios Philothei and the Archbishop's House are important religious and cultural landmarks in Athens and attract many visitors each year.

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Home Store Decor Carpets is a store in Athens, Greece that specializes in home decor and carpets. The store offers a wide range of products for decorating and enhancing homes, including carpets, rugs, and other floor coverings, as well as a variety of home textiles, such as cushion covers, blankets, shawls, towels, curtains and other accessories. The store offers custom design services, helping customers to select the perfect products to suit their individual tastes and needs. Whether you're looking for a new rug, a piece of carpet, or a complete home makeover, Home Store Decor Carpets is the place to find what you need in Athens.

Koutsouroupas Georgios is a shop in Athens, Greece, specialising in souvenirs and traditional Greek food and beverages. The shop is likely a great place to find unique and authentic gifts to bring back home, as well as a variety of delicious food and drink items to sample while in Athens. Whether you're looking for a unique trip souvenir or want to try some of Greece's famous cuisine, Koutsouroupas Georgios is the perfect place to start.

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Adrianou Street is a street located in Athens, Greece. It is one of the oldest and most historic streets in the city and runs through the heart of the Plaka neighbourhood, which is known for its charming old buildings, narrow alleyways, and vibrant atmosphere. Adrianou Street is lined with shops, cafes, restaurants, and other businesses and is a popular destination for tourists and locals. Whether you're looking for souvenirs, traditional Greek food, or just a place to relax and people-watch, Adrianou Street has something for everyone. It's a must-visit when you're in Athens!

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The Lysikrates Monument is a monument located in Athens, Greece. It was built in the 4th century BCE by the wealthy Athenian benefactor Lysikrates as a testament to his funding of theatrical productions, or choruses, as part of the religious and civic life of ancient Athens. The Lysikrates Monument is a cylindrical tower made of marble, with a Corinthian capital and a decorated frieze.

The monument is one of the best-preserved examples of a Choragic Monument, which was erected by wealthy Athenians to commemorate their funding of choruses in theatrical productions. Today, the Lysikrates Monument is a popular tourist attraction and a symbol of the rich cultural and architectural heritage of Athens. Whether you're interested in ancient history or classical architecture or want to see something truly unique, the Lysikrates Monument is a must-visit in Athens.

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Tripodon Street, located in the Plaka neighbourhood of Athens, is considered one of the oldest streets in Europe, with a history of over 2,500 years. This historic street is a continuation of the ancient road that once connected the Theater of Dionysus to the Agora, and it has maintained its name throughout the centuries.

In ancient times, Tripodon Street was known for its beauty, as it was lined with monuments dedicated to the god Apollo and was the site of torch processions in honour of Dionysus. The street's name was derived from the copper tripods on its sides, which were sponsors' prizes in the theatre competitions.

Throughout the years, Tripodon Street has continued to attract famous figures such as Lord Byron, who marvelled at its picturesque beauty, and Greek artists, writers, actors, and intellectuals like Kostis Palamas, Alexandros Papadiamantis, and Melina Merkouri. Today, Tripodon Street is still known for its stunning views of the Acropolis, the Temple of Zeus, and the city of Athens, making it a must-visit destination for those interested in history and culture.

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The church of Saint Nicolas Rangavas in Athens is dedicated to Saint Nicholas, who was a bishop of Myra in the 4th century. Saint Nicholas is venerated as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church. He is known for his acts of kindness and generosity, including his saving three poor sisters from being sold into slavery by providing them with dowries.

Saint Nicholas is also known as the patron saint of sailors, merchants, and children, and his feast day is celebrated on December 6th. The church of Saint Nicolas Rangavas in Athens was built in his honour, and it is a place of worship for the local community.

The church is on Tripodon Street - a historic street in Athens, Greece, with a rich history of over 2,500 years. The road was once a major thoroughfare connecting the Theater of Dionysus to the Agora. It was known for its beauty, with monuments dedicated to the god Apollo and torch processions honouring Dionysus.

Lisiou Street is located in Athens, Greece. It is a famous street in the city known for its lively atmosphere and many shops, restaurants, cafes, and bars. Lisiou Street is a hub of activity and a great place to spend a day exploring the city and its sights and sounds. Whether you're looking for souvenirs, local food, or a place to relax and people-watch, Lisiou Street has something for everyone.

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Mnesikleos Street, located in the centre of Athens, is known for its vibrant nightlife and many bars, pubs, and taverns. The street is a popular destination for locals and tourists, and it is a hub of activity during the evenings and late into the night. The atmosphere on Mnesikleos Street is lively and energetic, with people gathered outside the bars and taverns to socialise, drink, and dance.

One of the main attractions of Mnesikleos Street is its variety of bars and taverns, each offering a unique ambience and atmosphere. Some bars and taverns have a traditional feel, with Greek music playing and locals gathering to drink, dance, and socialise. Other bars and pubs are more modern, with a younger crowd and a more upbeat vibe. Some bars and taverns cater to different music genres, such as rock, jazz, and reggae.

In addition to its bars and taverns, Mnesikleos Street is also known for its street performers and artists, who add to the lively atmosphere of the street. There are also many street vendors selling souvenirs and street food, adding to the bustling and vibrant atmosphere of the road.

Overall, Mnesikleos Street is a great place to experience the nightlife and energy of Athens. It is a must-visit destination for anyone looking for a lively and exciting evening in the city.

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Geros Tou Moria Restaurant, located in Athens, Greece, is a traditional tavern with a rich history and a warm and welcoming atmosphere. The buzz of conversation and laughter can be heard throughout the restaurant, creating a lively and welcoming vibe.

One of the main interests of Geros Tou Moria Restaurant is its local wines, which are served to complement traditional Greek cuisine. The restaurant is proud of its home wine, including red and white, and the staff is knowledgeable and friendly, and happy to assist with wine recommendations.

In addition to the local wines, Geros Tou Moria Restaurant is also known for its traditional Greek music, which is performed live by local musicians. The music adds to the restaurant's romantic atmosphere, and it is a popular feature among guests. The music is typically performed on traditional bouzouki and the guitar, and it is an integral part of the dining experience at Geros Tou Moria Restaurant.

Finally, the traditional Greek food served at Geros Tou Moria Restaurant highlights the dining experience. The menu features a variety of classic Greek dishes, including moussaka, souvlaki, and tzatziki, all made with fresh, locally-sourced ingredients. The plates are beautifully presented and are sure to satisfy even the most discerning of palates. Whether you're in the mood for a hearty meal or a shareit, Geros Tou Moria Restaurant has something to offer.

In conclusion, Geros Tou Moria Restaurant is a must-visit destination for anyone looking to experience the traditional cuisine, wine, and music of Greece. The restaurant's warm and welcoming atmosphere, combined with its delicious food and local wines, make it a truly unforgettable dining experience.

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